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PUB HISTORY
Hastings, St Leonards,
Rye & Lewes

  

  


LOST PUBS A-E

Introduction

What follows is a selection of the ‘Lost Pubs of Hastings and St Leonards’, that do not feature in the book The Pubs of Hastings and St Leonards 1800–2000. It supplements the appendix on ‘Lost Pubs’ in the book published in 2011.


Albert Hotel, Queens Road
The Albert Hotel was situated on the north corner of Albert Road and Queens Road. Canon Wilberforce laid the foundation stone for the Coffee Palace Hotel Company there in 1881. Thereafter, it was known as the Albert Temperance Hotel but in 1884 it went into liquidation with its shareholders complaining there was too much competition in the town for the temperance trade.

The next owner gave up temperance and applied for a full licence in 1885, granted in 1886. Business dramatically increased when it started serving alcohol to customers from the Gaiety Theatre next door. The licence was not renewed in 1888 because of opposition from the Globe Tavern two doors away. “This is not a normal hotel”, said the Globe manager, “it has been turned into an ordinary public house”. The magistrates noted that “there were the usual coloured glasses hung up around the bar, two barmaids and customers ‘tossing for beer’. The area is a perfect plum pudding of public houses”, they said. There were apparently 36 public houses within a quarter mile radius of the hotel.

The Albert closed in 1892/3. It is noted in local history as the birth place of the Hastings Chess Club in 1882.


Alma Tavern, 95 All Saints Street

The Alma was an Old Town beer house and lodging house. It was named after the Battle of the Alma in the Crimea in 1856. In 1859 Belville Tyrrell, a cordwainer, a maker of fine shoes, was landlord. In the 19th century there was a social distinction between a cordwainer and a cobbler (between a shoemaker and a shoe repairer).

One evening in the 1850s a stolen chicken was exchanged over the bar for 6d [2½p] and a half-pint of beer. In 1859 the landlord was summonsed for the unlawful sale of beer out of hours. By this time the Alma had two bars: a tap room and a public bar and was a favourite haunt of hop pickers from the hop fields located around the town including what is now Alexandra Park.

In the 1860s  Belville Tyrell employed a boy with a mule and chaise to take customers home at the end of the evening. Arthur Broocks was landlord from 1896 until 1900 when the Alma was taken over by Frederick Eastland, a labourer, who worked during the day to supplement his income. He charged 6d a night for a bed. The Alma closed for a year in 1906 until Arthur Broocks took over again in 1907. It closed finally in 1908 after which Arthur Broocks ran it as a general store until 1926.


Anchor, Fishmarket

Leased by the corporation in 1681 to Richard Fauntly at 12d [5p] a year. It closed before the opening of the current Anchor, George Street in 1797.


Ancient Druids, 57 George Street. A beer house from 1841

In the 1850s these premises were advertised as the Stogumber Pale Ale Stores under the proprietorship of James Phillips, Bottled Ale and Porter Merchant. In 1854 he advertised himself as the local agent for ‘Stogumber Medicinal Pale Ale, brewed with the water from Harry Hill’s Well’. He claimed that this beer was a leading recipe for bad indigestion and ‘want of appetite’.






Hastings & St Leonards News 1854


In 1866 James Phillips moved from 57 George Street to become first landlord of the London Stores and Oyster Bar in Queens Road (now Bar Moda). The premises were then licensed to Thomas Cruttenden, who was granted a full pub licence in 1867. He told the magistrates that a branch of a popular friendly society called the Ancient Order of Druids, held their meetings here, and said that ‘additional premises were to be provided’ for them, suggesting perhaps, that there was not enough room available.

Subsequently, from the late 1860s the pub was known as the Ancient Druids and Ludwig Kessler was the licensee. The last landlord was Frank Sawyer. His name was entered in the Hastings Borough Register for 1874 but was then crossed through without explanation. The premises are now The Old Gallery.


The Bedford dates from around 1865 as a small town centre hotel. In 1905 the licensee became bankrupt. In his previous employment he had been a clown in an Australian circus. In the First World War customers stuck coins onto a mirror which they collected ‘for soldier’s cigarettes’.

The pub had ground floor and first floor bars and was bombed during the Battle of Britain. Several people were buried in the rubble and two were killed. One, a hawker standing outside with his barrow, was caught by a fragment and died instantly. Air-raid precaution staff attached to a big multiple store nearby, rescued the landlord and his wife from the destroyed saloon bar.

The pub was named after the Duke of Bedford whose family name: Russell, is recorded in Russell Street nearby. The Bedford licence was held in suspense for six years by Leney’s Brewery before being transferred to the Robert De Mortain on the Ridge when that pub opened in 1946. The Hastings branch of the Santander now stands on the site.


Bee Hive, Wellington Court

The Bee Hive was a beer house tied to Breeds brewery and formerly situated on one corner of the brewery complex in the Bourne.

A police constable visited the house in 1874 to investigate a tramp who was trying to sell two pieces of muslin and a boy’s shirt. The articles were wet as though they had been hanging on a clothesline. Four days later the same man was found with three loaves, some butter and a scarf taken from a fishing boat called Little Polly, on Hastings beach. The tramp told Minnie Giles, who was lodging in the pub, that he “had bought the food expecting to go whelking, but the wind was contrary and the boat would not go off”. “The bread was very stale,” she said.

One evening in 1882 William Smith, a labourer, also lodging at the Bee Hive, went into the tap room to play his violin. He placed it on the table and ordered half a pint. He suddenly heard a smash and his violin, which he had made out of a cigar box, was in a thousand pieces. Fanny Berrigan, ‘a massive specimen of a woman’, was charged with its destruction. In court she offered another side to the story: “When I sang Joe the Marine”, she said, “he mocked me with his old fiddle”.

In the 1890s the Bee Hive was a popular lodging house for ‘shoeys’ ie shoeblacks. In 1894 two shoeys came to blows in the taproom over an argument about Guy Fawkes. In the same year another shoey lodger died whilst drinking in the Wellington (recently the Smugglers) in White Rock. Not even his drinking companions knew his name and he was buried anonymously!

In 1908 the licensee Angelo Orel, a colourful character, wore a blue and white tie, a green waistcoat and a rosette when applying to renew his licence. He was described as ‘the regular keeper of all the common lodging houses in Hastings’. This dubious statement did not impress the magistrates and the beer house was declared redundant and closed.  Angelo Orel continued his career as a landlord of other pubs in town ending up at the Rising Sun, Battle Road from 1922–1938.

A beehive is a common symbol of the Freemasons. The Breeds family who owned the brewery may have had a connection with freemasonry.


Bird in Hand, South Street

A beer house tied to Chandler’s Wiltshire Brewery. In 1855 the landlord was fined 10s [50p] for opening out of hours and in 1859 another landlord, Tilden Tolhurst, had a day job in a second hand clothes shop in West Street. Previously he had been landlord of the The Original Good Woman at the Fishmarket and the Prince of Wales in Waterloo Passage.

In 1860 the pub suffered from a bad outbreak of fire and from then on seemed to go downhill. In 1866 it was only selling half a barrel of beer a week and was described as ‘more like a private house with a below average trade’. In 1920 the landlady, Gertrude McMahon, was charged with snatching three large plaice from a fish barrow in King’s Road. In her defence she said the hawker had run up credit in her pub to the amount of 16s [80p] by treating everyone in the pub when he was drunk. The fish hawker had paid off some of the debt but not all of it. The case was dismissed. The Bird in Hand closed in 1921.


Black Horse, 42 Priory Road, Halton

Formerly Johnson’s beer house when Robert Johnson was licensee in 1866. In 1876 landlord James Jones was fined 5s [25p] for allowing bad language. In 1892 the licensee by the name of Beck bought some blankets from a woman over the bar but refused to pay for them claiming they ‘had been taken out in beer’.

In 1912 the landlord ran this beer house to augment his income as a house painter. Although the pub did a considerable ‘jug trade’ the chief constable was opposed to the renewal of its licence because it ‘did not come up to expectations’. When the licensee was asked by the magistrate if he had anything to say, he replied: ‘Not much good sir’ [laughter in court]. It closed in 1912.


Black Horse, Priory

This beer house, on the site of Holy Trinity Church, removed to Shepherd Street, St Leonards after the expulsion of the ‘Americans’ from America Ground in the 1830s. It later became the Foresters Arms.


Black Spreadeagle, Courthouse Street

Mortgaged in 1611 by James Knight, a cooper and sold in 1613.


Blacksmith’s Arms, High Street

A court case involving the landlord William Woolger and a number of  allegedly stolen fishermen’s baskets was reported in the local press in 1848. Thomas Brandon Brett said he ‘kept the books’ for the landlord of the Blacksmiths Arms in the late 1840s. Its sign apparently read: By Hammer and Hand All Things Do Stand.


Bohemia Arms, 76 Bohemia Road. 1867-1871





Bricklayers Arms, Warrior Square

Thomas Sewell was listed as the licensee in 1849 when this ‘newly erected public house’ was first licensed. The pub is listed in the 1854 Hastings Directory and was used by the St Mary Magdalene Vestry for parish meetings during the 1850s and possibly until Warrior Square was completed in 1865.

It was reported that ‘the railway company was stipulating with the owners of the road passing the house and leading to the site of the station’, which suggests it was located in Western Road or possibly King’s Road. It was 144 yards from the Warrior’s Gate and there were not more than six houses between the Bricklayers and the Warrior’s Gate at that time.


Britannia, Bourne Street

A beer house and lodging house run by Thomas Piddlesden in 1869. He was accused by the police of allowing ‘great disturbances’ although he was at sea most of the time and his wife could not keep control of the house. His licence was renewed in 1870 although he was cautioned. In 1871 William Quelch was refused outright. The house presumably closed at this date.


British Hotel, Mercatoria

This inn was granted a full licence in 1852 although it was a beer house before that date. Henry Coussens dates it to 1833 but gives no reference. Situated on the corner of East Ascent, formerly Clement’s Place, it is an unusual building with a curved corner wall, now known as Clarence House.

Originally known as the Commercial Inn it changed its name to the British Hotel in 1858. In 1856 the St Mary Magdalene Vestry held parish meetings here to discuss among other things, the boundary dispute between Hastings and St Leonards and whether or not St Leonards should become a suburb of Hastings, or remain a town in its own right.

 By the 1860s it was the meeting place of the St Leonards regatta committee who organised a regatta every summer, and in later years of the St Leonards Rowing Club who prepared for the summer racing against the Hastings and Eastbourne clubs. Other customers were members of the St Leonards Cycling Club which also met here.

In 1871 a tramp who called in for a drink was accused of stealing a bottle of whisky by using the ‘London matchbox trick’, (see Castle Shades below). He took a light for his clay pipe from the gas lamp behind the bar and while doing so blew the lamp out. Whilst the barman searched for matches he snatched a bottle of whisky. In court he

First opened in 1867 on the corner of Tower Road and Bohemia Road as a free house. It first applied for a full licence in 1878 but remained a beer house until 1949 when it gained a wine licence.

Its most famous landlord was Percy Watford (1931–1955) the father of Gwen Watford the English film, stage, and television actress who grew up in the pub. Gwen Watford made her stage debut at the White Rock Theatre, Hastings in 1944 at the age of 17. After the war she moved to London to train at the Old Vic and made her film début playing Lady Usher in The Fall of the House of Usher in 1949.  Her other films included Cleopatra, (1963) and Cry Freedom (1987). In her obituary the Guardian described her as a ‘Purveyor of Repressed Passions’.

Elderly resident Vic Chalcraft said: ‘I remember this landlord well. He liked to be addressed as Mr Watford and was very much a traditionalist. He was known locally for his upright bearing and his pointed and waxed  moustache.’

In 1968 Jim Elvery took over the pub with his wife and, at the age of 21, became at that time the youngest licensee in Sussex and Kent. In its final years the Bohemia Arms had one single bar curving around the corner of Tower Road and Bohemia Road. The Bohemia Arms closed in 1971 and with the Prince of Wales was the second pub to close in Bohemia during that year.  It is now a computer shop.

claimed he had never heard of the matchbox trick, had never been to London in his life and had walked straight from Edinburgh. He got three months.

During these years regular customers got their beer by paying a fixed sum and being ‘let in’ on the spinning board, a device which determined who paid for the next round. The police later decided this was a form of gambling and it was stopped.

In its final years it was tied to Ballard’s Brewery for beer but was a free house for spirits. In 1905 it was described as a small hotel with a billiard room, eight bedrooms and four sitting rooms with fine sea views. In its final pub days it did very little trade, taking only 5s [25p] a day over the bar from the 1890s onwards. It closed in 1906.


Bulverhythe, Bexhill Road

See the Pubs of Hastings & St Leonards for full history.


Canteen, Halton 1807-1923

A beer house built by John Haisdell for the troops billeted on the Barrack Ground, Halton during the Napoleonic Wars.


Carpenter’s Arms

In 1770 this ‘very ancient and well accustomed public house near the seaside’ was offered for sale. Nothing else is known about it.


Carpenter’s Arms, Priory Road

Listed in the 1865 Directory.



Castle Shades, Castle Mews


The Castle Shades was located behind the Castle Hotel in Castle Mews off York Gardens. The Castle Hotel was the first major building erected to the west of Old Town in 1817.


In 1876 Ernest Sharp, a 14-year-old potboy who collected and washed the glasses, received one month’s imprisonment and twelve strokes of the birch for taking 30s [£1.50] out of the till.


In 1894 another version of the London matchbox trick was attempted here (see British Hotel above). A customer tugged at the gas chandelier causing the light to go out and the gas to escape. Arthur Collier the under barman re-lit the lamp only to find some ‘reserve money’ missing from a cigar box behind the bar. The police found a sovereign in the boot of a suspect customer.


The Castle Shades was known to be a haunt of ‘girls on the town’ and probably became the site of the hotel garage in the 1920s.



Clifton Tavern, 2 Stainsby Street


This pub, on the north side of Warrior Square railway station, was granted a spirit licence in 1870, but was a beer house before then. The first landlord was James Brockhill who stayed until 1888. During his time he encouraged several organisations to use the pub on a regular basis. In 1895, 80 members of the newly organised Hastings and St Leonards Branch of the Postmen’s Federation held their first annual general meeting here. They decided issues such as a minimum wage for postmen of £2 per week, pensions and ‘gratuity insurance’.


The St Leonards branch of the Buffaloes, which had 73 members, also held weekly meetings and before the First World War the Clifton had its own Benefit Society, which organised ‘Smoking Concerts’ and musical programmes. One such concert in 1913, entertained with renditions of ‘Drake Goes West’ [encore], ‘My Sporting Guide’, Ragtime piano and comic recitations by ‘The Three Freds’. On another evening it raised £14 for the local hospital. Using the historic retail price index, £14 in 1913 is worth £958 today!


In 1916, during the First World War, the potman, Alfred Winder, aged 40, was called up into the army. He appealed to the Hastings Military Tribunal, on the basis that his aged mother relied on the 14s [70p] a week he gave her. Their situation was ignored, exemption was refused and he was sent off to fight in France. It is not known whether he returned.


In the 1920s, the landlord applied to extend closing time by half an hour to 10.30pm, during July, August and September. Several customers, who were members of the St Leonards Allotments Association, worked on their allotments late on summer evenings and looked forward to a pint after heavy digging. They accompanied the  landlord to the magistrates court to lend their support. However, there was no change and the 10pm closing time stayed. Although members of the SLAA socialised in the Clifton, they possibly held association meetings here as well. The SLAA still exists and has a long local history.


From 1907 until 1938, the Clifton’s longstanding landlord was E.C. Bannister, who was awarded a silver tea set on his retirement. Some customers, who used the pub when he took over, were still there when he retired. One said: ‘I always thought “Dr” Bannister’s medicine kept me young and healthy’. Another customer had been drinking at the pub since 1886 and attended the landlord’s wedding.


During the Second World War, customers not called up were still active on their allotments ‘digging for victory’. In the evenings they played darts and won the Observer Annual Darts Tournament three years running, from 1942 to 1944, beating all other Hastings pub teams. The prizes were National Savings Certificates. The chief constable opposed an application for a music licence in 1942. ‘I’m not having this class of public house turned into a community singing hall’, he said. In 1945 they were still digging for victory and supported the Hastings Food Production Exhibition attended by 15,000 people at White Rock. The main exhibit was entitled Dawn of Peace, in a design of red and yellow tomatoes, against a background of potatoes, with the words: ‘1939-1945 Victory. Thank you’, in runner beans. All were grown from seeds donated by America.


Customers were still winning at darts in 1970, when the Clifton Ladies’ Team beat all other ladies’ teams in the Watney’s Games League. Around 500 people gathered in the ballroom on Hastings pier to watch them receive their trophy.


During the entire lifetime of the Clifton, there does not seem to have been any recorded incident of drunkenness, bad behaviour or serving out of hours. Literally, pub life on the other side of the railway track seemed to be a long way from that of some other pubs. But all good things must come to an end and in the 1980s the Clifton was let down by the Phoenix Brewery, and licensees Wally and Enid Beerling threatened to sue them for poor maintenance. In 1986, one regular, Winnie Suckling, who had been drinking there since the 1920s, was presented with a set of glass goblets and guaranteed a free drink every day for the rest of her life. The pub closed in the 1990s and although it didn’t become a ‘community singing hall’ it did become a community centre! Its name and sign, an impression of the Clifton suspension bridge in Bristol, was painted directly onto the front wall.






 



Coachmakers, St Leonards


In 1855 John Uckober, an East Indian sailor employed on British Merchant vessels, was charged with being drunk and noisy outside this beer house. He claimed he had sailed from Calcutta in a ship called the Mary Ann, which had been wrecked. All on board had perished except himself and the captain from whom he had a begging letter. The police were called and he was cautioned.


Conqueror Inn, Marina

A taproom and bar attached to the Conqueror Hotel, St Leonards from around 1830. Thomas Brett noted that it was a meeting place: “Where the warm politicians of that period assembled to read the newspapers … and to criticise the doings of parliament and talk over the affairs of the nation.”

In 1837 Mrs Eliza Rainer of 24 Marina was informed by the police that they had found her back door open at night. The house was empty because ‘the servants had all gone to the Conqueror Inn’. Now the site of Marine Court.


Cottage, Hughenden Place

Possibly an off-licence but more likely a beer house. During the First World War in 1917 the licensee was charged for serving three women accompanied by soldier boyfriends, which was an offence under the Defence of the Realm Act.


Cottage of Content, 8 London Road, St Leonards

A beer house on the south-western corner of Norman Road and London Road, recorded in the 1851 census. Landlord Thomas Dawson applied for a full licence in 1850 and again in 1851, but was refused, probably because he had been fined for selling gin and because of recurring disorder in the house.

The magistrates commented on the large number of licensed premises in the area making it ‘a perfect bee-hive of a town’. It was described as ‘forty feet from the Warrior’s Gate and forty more from the Crown’, and was owned by Mantell Eldridge, owner of the Saxon Hotel and Shades and the St Leonards Brewery and its tap, the Crown. It is now the site of the Love Cafe.


Crown and Three Mackerel

A licensed premises in the Parish of St Clements,1755–1771.


Crown House (The), 57 Marina, St Leonards

A blue plaque tells us that The Crown House, formerly Victoria House, was the first building in the new town of St Leonards-on-Sea. It dates from 1828 when it was the home of James Burton the town’s creator. In 1834 Princess Victoria stayed here before she became Queen.

Today we tend to think that prefabrication is a modern idea but surprisingly the Crown House was pre built in Regents Park, London and then transported via the Thames and the sea to St Leonards where it was erected.

In the Second World War between August 1940 and July 1944 the Crown House was bombed five times and in 1949 it was reported to be ‘in a severe state of repair’. The lead flashing and gutters had been stolen and the roof was in a shocking condition. Composite roofing put on during the war had perished and the original 13 foot chimney was leaning and dangerous. Hastings Council debated its future and at one time considered it as a possible Museum of the Regency and Victorian periods. They asked the Minister for Town and Country Planning to ‘remove this Regency Villa from the scope of the Development Order for the Marina’. A preservation order was refused until 1952 when the Council gave its private owner, who also owned other bomb damaged property at 11 White Rock and Regency Mansions, three months to repair or demolish the building. The building was finally repaired in August of that year.

It was then reoccupied and became a local office of the National Assistance Board until the 1960s. It then became the Tudor Rose Social Club. It was refurbished in 1970 and was reported as being ‘covered in scaffolding’.

In the early 1970s the social club was taken over by a ‘consortium’ of employees from the Ponswood industrial estate who later purchased the lease of the Golden Hind, Havelock Street. It became the Crown House public house around 2002.

Reopened in 2011 and closed in 2012.


Crystal Palace, Bourne Street

A beer house named after the famous exhibition of 1851. A constable observed ten prostitutes and thirteen men in the bar in 1854.


Denmark Arms, Denmark Place, 1864–1943

In 1879 the main customers were boatmen and fish hawkers. The latter usually left their barrows outside blocking the road until they were called out by a customer or the police. The pub advertised itself in the 1892 Directory next to another advert for the Carlisle, which had ‘just been modernised’. The pub was granted a music and singing licence for wireless concerts only in 1923.

The following letter was sent by the landlord to the licensing magistrates during an air raid in 1940:-

Denmark Hotel
33 Pelham Street
Hastings

October 1st 1940


Dear Sir,

Owing to the raid yesterday we had our windows blown in and are unable to open these premises at night until we are properly fixed up for blackout again. So shall be able to open only during the mornings, until everything is in order.
Hoping this will meet with your approval.

I remain
Yours Faithfully

A. H. Drury

The pub struggled on through the war years until it was bombed in 1943 and never reopened. Its licence was held in suspense until 1960 when it was transferred to a new pub, the Comet in Harley Shute Road.


Derby Arms, Union Street

The Derby Arms is listed in the 1854 Directory with J Barnes as landlord. In the same year the licence was transferred twice – first to Thomas Baker in July and then to William Bowra in December. A nearby beer house was reported for “selling more spirits than the Derby”, suggesting the Derby was fully licensed.

The 1855 Post Office Directory for Sussex lists the Derby Arms in Union Street, St Leonards but doesn’t give a number and a report in 1856 talks of customers playing skittles and ‘ringing the bull’. An upturned hook often in the form of a bull’s horn, was fixed into the wall about the same height as a dart board. Six or seven feet away, players attempted to ‘ring the bull’ by swinging a brass ring suspended from the ceiling on a cord. This is an early example of the game. The Oxford English Dictionary lists the first reference to it in 1851.

Vestry meetings and harmonic evenings or singing evenings were also held here. In 1869 the licence was transferred from Frederick Verhof to George Forsythe. Thereafter, the Derby disappears as mysteriously from local history as it appeared 15 years before. It was not listed in the licensees register for 1872.


Diamond, Bourne Walk


From 1862 Jane Cox, the licensee’s wife, ran the Dun Horse single handed until her husband’s death in 1865. Although her husband had been a bedridden invalid she could not get the licence transferred to herself while he was alive. Only on her husband’s death was she able to take the licence. Jane Cox’s beer house prospered and she was granted a full licence in 1869.

In the 1880s, on at least one occasion, landlord Robert Smith asked a customer if he ‘would make one of four for a raffle’. The customer replied: “He would rather pay for his own beer”, and in 1887 when temperance campaigners were trying to get Sunday closing, Smith, at a large meeting of publicans in the Market Hall, made an ‘energetic speech bristling with strong accusations against teetotallers’.

In 1892, the year of a general election, the Hastings Conservative candidate Wilson Noble went against Conservative policy by expressing support for the ‘Sale of Intoxicating Liquors to Children’ bill. This bill condemned, among other things, the widespread practice of sending children to the Jug and Bottle for beer for home consumption.

There was uproar in Hastings Conservative circles when Smith threatened to stand against Noble ‘in the publican interest’. Wilson Noble then withdrew his support for the bill. In the 1890s the Dun Horse held ‘Smokers’ for the Halton Workingmen’s Conservative Association.

The Dun Horse licence was opposed by the chief constable in 1912 who claimed that the pub’s trade had increased only because of ‘the undesirable element overflowing from the nearby Hope’. It was then referred for redundancy but reprieved.

The late Ron Fellows was born in 193? His grandfather, A E Fellows was chairman of the thriving Dun Horse Games Club in the 1930s and his family were involved in the Halton community since at least 1900 (see the Fortune of War).

The Dun Horse lasted several more years until closure in 1958.


Eagle Tavern, 9 Bourne Street. The tap of the Eagle Brewery.

In 1861 a customer ‘had some beer and cooked some fish which he ate’, suggesting it was also a lodging house.

In 1872 the licensee Joseph White was charged with permitting riotous conduct. A police constable went into the beer house and found a man ‘offering to fight the best man in Hastings’. There were 16 people inside and only three were sober.

In 1886 the landlord was fined 5s [25p] for allowing cards to be played for beer money. The pub changed hands four times between 1892-1894, in one case because the landlord couldn’t afford to pay the rates. It was also closed for a time. One of the first victims of the 1904 Licensing Act, it closed in 1905.


Earl of Arundel, 53 Havelock Road

Formerly Adgo’s Beer House in 1867, then the New Golden Cross in 1871, Fairman’s Hotel 1882, McLaren’s Hotel 1902 and the Earl of Arundel in 1905. Local businessman John Adgo moved here from the Old Golden Cross two doors away, when he failed to purchase that public house in 1867.

In 1899 it was advertised as the New Golden Cross and featured Hastings’s first Italian Restaurant. Prior to 1913 the licence was transferred seven times. The licence was renewed in 1913 but then opposed by the police and closed. Now a café.



Edinburgh Castle, St Georges Road

The ‘newly erected’ Edinburgh Castle was first licensed in 1876. Attached was one and a quarter acres of pleasure ground used by two quoits teams in 1909. The popular Edinburgh Castle Benefit Society operated here for many years. Closed 1971.


Eight Bells, Courthouse Street

The Eight Bells became an inn during the latter part of the 18th century. The East Sussex Record Office has a copy of a mortgage for the Eight Bells for £30 dated November 1691, which occupied 19 and 21 Courthouse Street, ‘a messuage and backside etc’ in tenure of Edward Wilde.

From 1738 to 1779 Richard Tutt was the licensee and auctions were often held there. He was named as the owner in 1746 and his will of July 1789 described him as a Yeoman, and the premises as including a ‘garden, fire stoves, yard, room to lay wood in, wash house, cellar and appurtenances’. The Sussex Weekly Advertiser 20/2/1797 announced the pub’s sale after the death of Richard Tutt, second son of the above.  (Hastings & St Leonards History Group Newsletter no. 11, 2007–8.)


Eversfield Arms, 1 Eversfield Place.

Was first licensed in 1854 and shown on the temperance map of c1891. Eversfield Place was built before the completion of Warrior Square in 1865. The Eversfield Arms was the bar of the Eversfield Hotel and had a six-day licence. It was forced to close during the war. Recently a Fortes restaurant and currently the Ghurkha restaurant.


Bedford Arms, Queens Road

Brahms and Liszt, Marina

Opened in 1986. A short lived Real Ale bar on the seafront.

Earl of Arundel 2012

Earl of Arundel late 19th century

Angel, 1 St Mary’s Terrace

See The Pubs of Hastings & St Leonards for full history.


Barrattini’s Sports Bar, 43 Marina

See The Pubs of Hastings & St Leonards for full history.

Licensees:

1829–1975                    Walter Addison & family (bakery and licensed restaurant)
1975                              Mr & Mrs McGlade                                                      (Mr Cherry’s Wine Bar)
1977–1982                    M Harris & I Mitchell
1985                              Euan McKenzie
1988–1990                    Brenda & Sarah Chidzoy                                             (The James Burton)
1993                              John Edwards
1994                              Jeremy Rowe (for sale)
1997–1998                    Craig Gardner                                                             (Cherry’s Bar)
1998–2003                   (Closed)
2003–2007                                                                                                      (Kollege Kantina)
2008–2009                                                                                                      (Burton’s Bar)
2009–2011                                                                                                      (Barrattini’s Sports Bar)
2012                             (Closed)

Drawing by James Gray

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This photograph of the most recent Beaconsfield sign shows a beacon in a field, the artist possibly alluding to the beacon on East hill. However he/she was mistaken as the pub was named after a former British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield of Hughenden, Buckingham (1876).

2010

Beaconsfield, 45 Hughenden Road

The following three photographs were contributed by Trevor Monk of Beckley, grandson of James and Clara Monk, licensees from 1914 to 1956. The photo below shows that the Beaconsfield Hotel was tied to the Finn brewery of Lydd. Was this the only Finn’s pub in Hastings?

Duke of York, Union Street

Opened in 1852 as the Carpenter’s Arms but changed its name to the Duke of York by 1855.

In 1864 a man named Reeves hired a room for ‘fiddling and dancing’, which created a great noise upstairs. A policeman observed ‘thirteen men and six prostitutes carousing’. He kept watch and saw them leave at dawn. The landlord was cautioned for keeping a disorderly house and later the policeman suffered a torrent of abuse from one of the women, Susan Lee, for which she received a week’s imprisonment. When the licence came up for renewal it was declined. This led to the landlord being evicted and replaced. This in turn led to problems with the full licence, which was only renewed without the music and with the landlord William Ralph gone.

In 1866 there was a terrible case of a man, who lodged here, beating and starving his small son whom he sent out to beg. He was finally imprisoned and the child put into care.

In 1872 a woman from Alfred Street, separated from her husband because of harassment, also lodged here. In court he said: “I will read out my defence as if I was at sea. I have been at sea all my life and don’t know any other way” [laughter]. The court insisted that he stay out of the pub and leave his wife alone.

The 1871 census records the landlady Mary Fairhall, her sister, daughter and two sons all living and working in the pub. Also recorded were 10 lodgers, all musicians in a band.

In 1876 a Coroner’s Inquest was held at the pub into the tragic suicide of George Beany, a painter by the nickname of Cuckoo. Cuckoo Beany had been in the workhouse several times and sometimes slept on a sack on a board, in a small workshop at the top of the public steps in Alfred Street. He was discovered hanging from a beam in the workshop. This was the same workshop later occupied by Adams and Jarrett when they employed Robert Noonan in the early 1900s and from where teams of builders left for ‘jobs’.

In the same year, 1876, the pub was taken over by Frederick Hemmings who renamed it the New Inn. Hemmings described himself as a ‘manufacturer of mineral and aerated water and ginger beer’, and his horse drawn four-wheeled van with his name on the side, was to be seen all over Hastings delivering mineral water. He must have been very successful as in 1885, he set up a new factory, the St Leonards Mineral Water Works in Park Road, Bohemia, (now the Tile Factory).

From 1884–1885 the pub was unoccupied until it was taken over by George James Fellows in 1886 who changed the name back to the Duke of York.

In the 1890s the Duke of York became briefly, the headquarters of the St Leonards Bonfire Boys who were established in 1854. In 1892 the Hastings Temperance Union who attempted to present a petition to the magistrates, opposed the renewal of the licence. The magistrates noticed that the petition had been altered after the signatures had been collected and refused to receive it.

By 1905 the pub occupied the ground floor and three tenants lived above. They all used the same entrance making police supervision difficult. The pub closed in 1907. It is most likely that the Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, the employees of Adams and Jarrett, then a building firm with a workshop at the end of the street, drank here.


Dun Horse, 29 Albion Street, Halton

“This is the Beaconsfield Hotel around 1914 which I assume was around the time my grandparents took over the Beaconsfield Hotel. My grandfather James Henry Monk is on the left, next to him is my father Horace William (Bill) Monk then comes his brother James Charlie Monk and finally my grandmother Clara Maud Mildred Monk (nee Bartholomew). My father was born in 1911 and his brother in 1907, James Henry was born in 1882 and Clara in 1884. James Henry died in 1956 when he was still landlord of the Beaconsfield and my grandmother carried on running it until about 1961 (with some part-time help from my father) and she died in 1963.”

 


 


 

 

 

“The above photo was taken outside the Beaconsfield in about 1922 as the baby in the photo, Leslie Monk, was born in 1921. My father is the boy in the centre. The final photo is of my grandparents at a pub function. My grandmother was a member of the Womens Auxillary League (women’s section of the Licensed Victuallers Association.”

According to the Register of Licensees for Hastings & St Leonards 1500–2000, the Beaconsfield opened in 1876 and closed in 2011(?) According to Alan Crouch of the Hastings Senior Forum and former drinker at the Beaconsfield, there was at one time a tontine club in Beaconsfield Road. He thinks this club may have been based in the Beaconsfield pub. Any further information about the Beaconsfield Tontine Club would be most welcome.

Dorset Arms, Duke Road 1870–1909

This beer house was also known as the Bug and Flea. In 1909, landlord Walter Haffenden worked during the day as a carpenter. The fact that he had an alternative income influenced the magistrates to declare the beer house redundant. It was closed down in 1909 and Walter Haffenden was compensated.

Dot Mitchell, nee Haffenden, has a brass spittoon from the Dorset Arms which she uses as a flower pot (2010).




One of four beer houses in the Breeds brewery complex in the Bourne.

In 1876 ‘a rough looking tramping woman called Catherine Wallis was thrown out of this beer house’. ‘She acted more like a beast than a woman’, but in her defence she said, “the country ale overcame me”. In 1885 the landlord was cautioned for serving out of hours.

The pub closed in 1925 and is the subject of a drawing by E Leslie Badham, which shows the pub sign shaped as a shield with the name The Diamond and a small diamond in the centre. (See: New Found Out.)

  The Dun Horse public house goes down before the breakers hammers as Halton clearance work proceeds.

















                              The Dun Horse public house goes down before the breakers hammers as Halton clearance work proceeds.


Eagle Tavern, 9 Bourne Street. The tap of the Eagle Brewery.

In 1861 a customer ‘had some beer and cooked some fish which he ate’, suggesting it was also a lodging house.

In 1872 the licensee Joseph White was charged with permitting riotous conduct. A police constable went into the beer house and found a man ‘offering to fight the best man in Hastings’. There were 16 people inside and only three were sober.

In 1886 the landlord was fined 5s [25p] for allowing cards to be played for beer money. The pub changed hands four times between 1892-1894, in one case because the landlord couldn’t afford to pay the rates. It was also closed for a time. One of the first victims of the 1904 Licensing Act, it closed in 1905.


Earl of Arundel, 53 Havelock Road

Formerly Adgo’s Beer House in 1867, then the New Golden Cross in 1871, Fairman’s Hotel 1882, McLaren’s Hotel 1902 and the Earl of Arundel in 1905. Local businessman John Adgo moved here from the Old Golden Cross two doors away, when he failed to purchase that public house in 1867.

In 1899 it was advertised as the New Golden Cross and featured Hastings’s first Italian Restaurant. Prior to 1913 the licence was transferred seven times. The licence was renewed in 1913 but then opposed by the police and closed. Now a café.


Edinburgh Castle, St Georges Road

The ‘newly erected’ Edinburgh Castle was first licensed in 1876. Attached was one and a quarter acres of pleasure ground used by two quoits teams in 1909. The popular Edinburgh Castle Benefit Society operated here for many years. Closed 1971.


Eight Bells, Courthouse Street

The Eight Bells became an inn during the latter part of the 18th century. The East Sussex Record Office has a copy of a mortgage for the Eight Bells for £30 dated November 1691, which occupied 19 and 21 Courthouse Street, ‘a messuage and backside etc’ in tenure of Edward Wilde.

From 1738 to 1779 Richard Tutt was the licensee and auctions were often held there. He was named as the owner in 1746 and his will of July 1789 described him as a Yeoman, and the premises as including a ‘garden, fire stoves, yard, room to lay wood in, wash house, cellar and appurtenances’. The Sussex Weekly Advertiser 20/2/1797 announced the pub’s sale after the death of Richard Tutt, second son of the above.  (HLHG Newsletter no. 11, 2007–8.)


Eversfield Arms, 1 Eversfield Place.

Was first licensed in 1854 and shown on the temperance map of c1891. Eversfield Place was built before the completion of Warrior Square in 1865. The Eversfield Arms was the bar of the Eversfield Hotel and had a six-day licence. It was forced to close during the war. Recently a Fortes restaurant and currently the Ghurkha restaurant.